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October 20, 1971
Premier Chou En Lai hosted talks with National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger and other U.S. officials. Chinese officials present included Yeh Chien-ying, vice chairman of the military commission, Chi Peng-fei, acting foreign minister, and others. The U.S. delegation included brigadier General James D. Hughes, Dwight L. Chapin, Alfred S. Jenkins, John H. Holdridge, Winston Lord, Commander Jonathan T. Howe, Dianne C. Matthews, and Julienne L. Pineau.
November 15, 1971
After being recognized by the United Nations and given a seat on the UN council, the first P.R.C. UN delegation arrived in New York. Their arrival was greeted by many reporters and representatives from the 23 sponsoring countries of the UN. They were also well received by the Americans as they entered the UN headquarters in New York.
February 21, 1972
President Nixon arrived in Beijing as the first American head of state ever to set foot on the Chinese Mainland. Nixon, Kissinger, and others met with Mao Zedong and Zhou Enlai, and at the end of the weeklong visit the two sides issued the Shanghai Communiqué. In this document the United States and China stated their positions on a number of issues, including joint opposition to the Soviet Union, the U.S. intention to withdraw its military from Taiwan, and U.S. support for a “peaceful settlement of the Taiwan question by the Chinese themselves.”
February 28, 1972
In 1972, The Shanghai Communique of President Nixon and Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai ended 23 years of isolation between the United States and China. Tucked into a single sentence was a brief reference to cooperation in science and technology (S&T).
June 23, 1972
Building upon President Nixon’s trip to the People’s Republic of China in February 1972, Ford and Congressman Hale Boggs of Louisiana visit and meet with Premier Chou En-Lai (Zhou Enlai).
January 1, 1973
The United States and China established Liaison Offices in Beijing and Washington.
November 1, 1973
A delegation of the Naitonal Council for U.S.-China Trade visited the PRC for the first time. They met with senior officials of the China Council for Promotion of International Trade
April 1, 1974
In 1974, leading members of the American Institute of Architects visited China for a three-week tour of the country. They were hosted by the Architectural Society of China.
August 20, 1977
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance traveled to Beijing to visit Chairman Hua, Foreign Minister Huang, and senior Chinese officials.
January 5, 1978
A high-ranking delegation of petroleum experts from the People's Republic of China visited the United States, sponsored by the Department of Energy, the first such tour ever officially sponsored by a U.S. government agency. The group of 16 oil and gas experts spent three weeks meeting with top U.S. energy officials and touring production, exploration and development facilities in Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and California.

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Commission Report

Polls show Americans and Chinese are becoming less trustful of each other’s country. The Commission assesses the problem and offers recommendations to foster greater U.S.-China collaboration and understanding.

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